Kleine Zelte (Small Tents)

In addition to the 14 large tents found at the Oktoberfest, there are also the smaller tents, which are mainly the rotisserie chicken stands like Wienerwald, Cafe Kaiserschmarrn (Rischart), Vinzenz Murr, Poschners, Heimer, Cafe Mohrenkopf, Bodos café tent, the Inn in Schichtl and the Ammer chicken and canard rotisserie that, since 2000, only sells organic products. Many people find that the smaller tents offer a more old-fashioned but more authentic Oktoberfest feeling that creates the traditional charm of Oktoberfest. 

The small tents are very diverse and offer many alternatives: wild parties, traditional beer tents, rustic, homey, or contemplative. In the small tents, you can enjoy lovingly prepared Bavarian food in a peaceful atmosphere. And of course, there is refreshing Oktoberfest beer. Often, you’ll be served by the tent hosts themselves.

Sources Referenced: München Betriebs-GmbH & Co. KG - Mit and Wiesnkini Project

In 1885, poultry dealer Joseph Ammer was allowed to construct his small booth at the Oktoberfest, creating the world’s first chicken roaster. The Ammer family’s 5th generation is now serving healthy organic chicken and duck in their landmark Oktoberfest tent. It only makes sense that one of the tents with the longest tradition on the Wiesn serves outstanding Augustiner beer out of wooden casks from Munich’s oldest brewery. Families are welcome during the daytime,  while later in the evening, when the kids have gone to bed,  band gets the party going for the adult visitors – until the bar closes at 11 pm

At the Oktoberfest since:  1885
Seats inside:  465
Seats outside:  472
Beer:  Augustiner Bräu
Host:  Josef Schmidbauer
Website:  http://www.ammer-wiesn.de/

In 1993, master confectioner Bodo E. Müller opened “Bodo’s Cafézelt”. Its homemade confectionery is now renowned in Munich and beyond. During the daytime, Bodo’s Cafézelt is the perfect port of call for families to stop for refreshments. A good coffee or a cappuccino may be enjoyed, accompanied for example by one of Bodo’s famous kirschwasser donuts, or non-alcoholic donuts for kids, strudels prepared in a variety of ways, or other sweet things like pastries and  ice cream. In the evening, it’s the perfect place for a flirty cocktail. There’s no beer served here – only champagne, cocktails and other spirits

At the Oktoberfest since:  1993
Seats inside:  479 sitting and 108 standing
Beer:  N
o beer, only wine, cocktails, and Champagne
Host:  Bodo E. Müller
Website:  https://www.bodos.de/html/oktfest.html

Café Mohrenkopf is the only tent at the Wiesn with its own bakery on the festival site and is the oldest café tent at the Oktoberfest. Café Mohrenkopf’s own bakery makes a varied selection of different fresh cakes, fruit tarts and cream cakes. The specialty of the tent is Mohrenkopf, a small, chocolate-glazed cream-cake. Café Mohrenkopf also serves breakfast from 9 or 10 am with freshly baked pretzels. In the evening, coffee is replaced with sparkling wine and cocktails. Instead of sweet treats, the café serves a selection of savory snacks and sandwiches, as well as homemade goulash soup.

At the Oktoberfest since:  N/A
Seats inside:  378
Beer:  No beer, only coffee, wine, Champagne, and cocktails
Host:  Gerhard and Magnus Müller-Rischart
Website:  https://www.rischart.de/oktoberfest/rischart-s-cafe-kaiserschmarrn/

This is a tent for sweet lovers and looks like a ‘Candyland’ game board and also resembles the fairytale Bavarian castle of Ludwig II, Neuschwanstein. Thanks to its unmissable appearance, the sugar castle near Bavaria is a popular meeting point. Café Kaiserschmarrn is also known as the Rischart Tent. There you can enjoy a coffee and baked specialties outdoors, or have breakfast inside – perfect for kids and the whole family. You can watch live as Kaiserschmarrn (light and fluffy fried chopped pancakes served with caramelized raisins and chopped almonds, topped with whip cream) is prepared in gigantic iron-pan.

At the Oktoberfest since:  1950
Seats inside:  420
Beer:  Various
beers, wine, and cocktails
Host:  Katharina Wiemes
Website:  http://www.cafe-mohrenkopf.eu/      

Proprietors Max and Rosie Feisinger offer traditional alpine delicacies based on cheese and everything that complements the cheese. Their specialty of the house is a unique dish called Raclette, which is melted cheese served on bread or potatoes with spicy extras such as, pickled cucumber and onions, and a nice selection of wines to accompany your cheese . More traditional dishes such as Bavarian roast pork and sausages with sauerkraut are also available. There is enough space for celebrations under lights hung with vines and wide tables and wooden benches. Regular guests affectionately call the Kas- and Weinstuben the “living room of the Wiesn ”. 

At the Oktoberfest since:  1978
Seats inside:  98
Seats outside:  90
Beer:  F
ranziskaner Weißbier, and wine
Host:  Max and Rose Marie Feisinger
Website:  https://wiesnzelt.de/

Since 1993 Peter Lingnau was already known at the  Oktoberfest, with his stall “Peters Meeresfrüchte”. In 2013, a dream came true when he was permitted to open a small tent. His cozy festival tent has a rustic ambiance in a maritime style. Nets, compass and shells everywhere – as a nod to Bavaria, a portrait of Luis Trenker hangs on the wall. The Fisch Bäda, is all about seafood. The menu  includes a total of 26 different fish rolls, zander fillet, char, fresh oysters, Oysters (6 Fines de Claire), scampi, squid  or Fietjes Fischkiste (various salads, salmon tartare, scallops). And – a rarity at the Oktoberfest: The Fisch-Bäda sells vegan wine .

At the Oktoberfest since:  2013
Seats inside:  130
Seats outside:  48 sitting and 70 standing
Beer:  Hacker-Pshorr
Host:  Peter Lingnau
Website:  https://fisch-baeda.de/

The Glöckle Wirt is a small tent, where you’ll get great service in a rustic cosiness, paired with atmospheric fun plus a true “celebratory menu” containing Bavarian and international specialties. Meal choices range from typical Bavarian fare such Schweinshaxn (grilled pork), ham hock, fillet pfanderl, grilled sausages, sandwich platters to Obatzda (a cheese specialty). The walls and ceilings of the tent are lovingly decorated with antique wind instruments, sleds, tendrils, kitchen utensils, jugs – right down to real oil paintings. This makes the Wiesn tent an unforgettable feast for the eyes.

At the Oktoberfest since:  1990
Seats inside:  226
Seats outside:  30 sitting and 45 standing
Beer:  S
paten & Franziskaner Weissbier
Host:  Stephanie Rollwagen eK, the daughter of Hanns-Werner Glöckle
Website:  https://gloeckle-wirt.de/index.html

Replacing Poschners Entenbraterei, this small Oktoberfest tent was first introduced in 2015 and accommodates 300 seated guests, with an additional 60 seats in the outside. One of the few small Wiesn tents to have its own small beer garden. The Goldener Hahn is reminiscent of an alpine hut and is furnished with great attention to detail. As the name suggests, this place is all about poultry. Chicken, roast chicken, goose and duck in various forms, on salad or as a Wiesnhendl or half-duck. But there are also vegetarian dishes and even one vegan option: a baked potato with hummus, cherry tomatoes and a salad. 

At the Oktoberfest since:  2015
Seats inside:  304
Seats outside:  57
Beer:  Spaten
Host:  Claudia, Josef, Sebastian and Daniel Able
Website:  www.ables-goldener-hahn.de /

The Hochreiter family has been active at the Munich Oktoberfest since 1973. In the first six years, a small sausage roasting shop was run next to the Bräurosl tent, until the vacated “Haxenbauer” tent was taken over in 1979 and renamed “Haxenbraterei Hochreiter”. The decoration and interior remained the same for the time being, but the grill station was modernized. Finally, in 1987, the entire tent was rebuilt, in which 250 guests can be served ever since. Some things have changed, but the friendly service and the high standards of the knuckles and all other dishes have remained. As the name suggests the tent specializes in Haxn (roasted pork knuckle or ham hock).

At the Oktoberfest since:  1979
Seats inside:  250
Beer:  Löwenbräu

Host: Dieter Hochreiter
Website: http://www.haxenbraterei.com/

Heimer’s Roasted Duck and Chicken’s tent is the last old-school small tent at the Oktoberfest, and very popular among the locals. It’s a relatively quiet tent since there is no live band. After not being admitted and making place for Goldener Hahn in 2016, the tent had to be rebuilt with only 300 instead of formerly 400 seats, luckily the tent, especially its visuals, didn’t change. Unusual for small tents, Heimer’s has a small beer garden to its side.  The house specialty is the roasted duck which is crispy on the outside and moist on the inside and is served with potato-dumplings and Blaukraut (cooked red cabbage that has a deep blue hue).

At the Oktoberfest since:  1977
Seats inside:  300
Seats outside:  46
Beer: Paulaner Weißbier
Host:  Helmut and Ignaz Schmid
Website:  www.heimer-entenbraterei.de

Heinz Wurst- und Huehnerbraterei”  – is a steeped in tradition, and is a family-owned enterprise that was established 1906 by Josef Heinz, and now the 5th generation of the family are operating the tent. The tent promotes itself with the slogan: “Go to Heinz’s for something fine.” Something fine – that includes a comprehensive selection of Bavarian Schmankerln (delicacies), in addition to their famous sausages and chickens, as well as vegetarian dishes. The sausage and chicken dishes are also available to-go. Compliment all that gorgeous food with first-rate Paulaner Oktoberfest beer, or another beverage from their generous beverage menu.

At the Oktoberfest since:  1906
Seats inside:  384
Beer: Paulaner
Host:  Petra Brenner und Herbert Heilmaier
Website: https://www.heinz-huehnerbraterei.de/en/

Schiebl’s Kaffeehafer (coffee mug) is one of the smallest and best-hidden places at the Oktoberfest that offer seats and is a friendly meeting place for the whole family. As the entrance next to the coffee stand is overlooked by many, the small tent with only about a hundred seats behind the stand is one of the Oktoberfest’s best-kept secrets. Coffee is offered in multiple variants, including Italian and Irish ones as well as wine. Breakfast dishes and vegetarian fare are served here as well as a wide variety of hot and fresh, including apple strudel (Apfelstrudel), yeast dumplings (Dampfnudel), Bavarian doughnuts (Auszogne), and deep-fried apple rings (Apfelkücherl).

At the Oktoberfest since:  1976
Seats inside:  60
Beer: No beer. Various wines and spirits
Host:  Valerie und Thomas Schiebl
Website: http://schiebls-cafebetriebe.de

The three Hochreiter brothers can be looked at as the kings of small Oktoberfest tents. After the family had already acquired the Haxnbraterei and Zur Bratwurst, Erich Hochreiter took the chance to take over Sigfried Able’s Kalbskuchl in 2014. Just as the Hochreiters always did it, concept, building, and name hardly changed with the acquisition. The tent looks like a large Bavarian mountain hut and specializes in veal and lots of it. Kalbsbraterei serves dishes such as Kalbsbraten (roast veal), Kalb (boiled veal), and other items too. The has a warm cozy atmosphere and definitely a place to show off your Tracht (traditional Bavarian clothes such as a Dirndl or Lederhosen).

At the Oktoberfest since:  2008
Seats inside:  300
Beer:  http://kalbsbraterei.de
Host:  Löwenbräu Oktoberfestbier or Franziskaner Weissbier.
Website: http://kalbsbraterei.de

Since 2010 Munich’s large butchery Vinzenz Murr has been present at the Oktoberfest in their tent, Metzgerstub’n (butcher’s room). This is the place to go for a traditional Bavarian meal consisting of Weisswurst (veal sausage), sweet mustard, and a pretzel. Aside from enjoying a typical Bavarian breakfast, the Metzgerstub’n offers a variety of local favorites such as an authentic Leberkäs-Semmel (liver meat loaf sandwich) freshly prepared and baked on the premises as well  real traditional Munich butcher’s specialties such as Saures Lüngerl, Schweinsbratwurst, original Munich white sausages as well as crispy grilled pork knuckles and spare ribs. 

At the Oktoberfest since:  2010
Seats inside:  130
Beer: Paulaner Weißbier
Host: Brandl Family
Website:  https://vinzenzmurr.de/metzger-stubn/

The Knödelei was the first small tent outside the Wirtsbudenstraße to focus on one specific type of food. Its location is, however, the tent’s biggest flaw: every four years, the central agricultural fair (Zentrallandwirtschaftsfest, ZLF) takes place, and the tent is replaced with stables and tractors. In 2014, the Knödelei was significantly extended, approximately quadrupled its size and getting additional seats and a bar. The dumpling is an icon of Bavarian cuisine, and the focus of the tent with over 50 scrumptious varieties of dumplings are available for consumption inside the giant dollhouse stove, such as: spicy dumpling with mushrooms, dumpling with spinach, dumpling with banana.

At the Oktoberfest since:  2002
Seats inside:  399
Seats Outside:  400
Beer:  Paulaner
Host:  Florian and Bettina Oberndorfer
Website: http://muenchner-knoedelei.de

Edmund Radlinger’s Münchner Weißbiergarte’n (Munich Wheat Beer Garden) has been the center of the Familienplatz (Family square) since its inauguration in 2006 and, is the only beer garden that is not attached to a tent. Food is offered with special offers that are served family-style. For example a mixed sausage platter (fried, wool and spleen sausage and liver cheese) with sauerkraut and mashed potatoes, or the family knuckle of pork, a family soup tureen,  and the “Münchner Bürger Platte” is also well suited for groups – with 1/2 chicken, 1/2 knuckle, rolled roast, meat loaf, meatballs, potato and coleslaw and dumplings with sauce.

At the Oktoberfest since:  2006
Seats Outside:  300
Beer:  Paulaner
Host:  Edmund Radlinger
Website: https://www.muenchner-weissbiergarten.de/

Poschner has stood for quality and tradition at the Oktoberfest since 1934. Our famous grilled chicken and duck specialties are prepared according to the original recipe of the company founder Bernhard Poschner and now in the in the fifth generation. In addition to the Poschner Oktoberfest classics, you will find chicken and duck – fresh from the grill, many other specialties and also vegetarian and vegan dishes. The redesign of the outer facade in 2016 takes into account the history of the largest and most beautiful folk festival in the world. The pictures and figures tell details from the history of the Oktoberfest.  The design comes from the Munich artist Tita Gronemeyer.

At the Oktoberfest since:  1934
Seats Inside:  400
Beer:  Hacker-Pschorr & Wiesnmärzen from a wooden barrel
Host: Berni and Thomas Luff
Website: https://poschners.de/index.php

Wildstuben host Trudi Renoldi is from Bremen, part of the showman family  that also runs the Höllenblitz. The building shows off a massive, contemporary, and impression of an alpine hut and has been offering a home to Oktoberfest party-goers since 2009. You’ll appreciate the intricate details of the woodwork and the hunting lodge ambience of the Wildstuben tent. Traditional game meats such as venison, boar, and rabbit are served here as well as hearty Bavarian fare like roast pork, beef, blood sausage, dumplings and sauerkraut. You’ll also find fresh salads, vegetarian fare, and savory snacks to go with the outstanding Augustiner Oktoberfestbier.

At the Oktoberfest since:  2009
Seats Inside:  271
Beer:   Augustiner-Bräu
Host:  Trudi und Klaus jun. Renoldi GbR
Website: http://wildstuben.de

Wirtshaus im Schichtl is one of the most famous Oktoberfest attractions, since the opening in 1869 and has held on to traditions such as daily executions (not real executions) as part of the stage show. The Schichtl theater, was extended by an adjacent restaurant in 2006. Since then it has been serving last meals to those waiting for the beheading during the show – and everyone else, of course. Extraordinarily, the tent only uses meats from Hermannsdorfer Landwerkstätten, a very expensive farm and butchery that is focused on sustainable organic meat production. Nonetheless, there’s a pretty good Weißwurst deal before noon.

At the Oktoberfest since:  1869 / 2006 (Tavern)
Seats Inside:  120
Beer:   Spaten
Host:  Manfred Schauer
Website: https://www.schichtl.by/wirtshaus.html

The Zum Stiftl is famous for its roast chicken and duck. Where else would you find a wooden ski lodge at the heart of the lovingly arranged, traditional Bavarian interior? The two level Wiesn tent Zum Stiftl has been at the Oktoberfest since 2008. Landlord Lorenz Stiftl has experienced at the Wiesn going back to 2002 running the Wienerwald tent. The company Stiftl has been running its Wiesn tent completely carbon-neutral since 2018, making it the first festival tent of its kind in the history of the Munich Oktoberfest. This tent looks more like a ski hut and gives you an aprés ski feeling and the new country-style interior echo’s the rustic ski lodge feeling.

At the Oktoberfest since:   2008
Seats Inside:
  365 and 100 standing outside at the bistro tables
Beer:  Paulaner
Host:  Lorenz Stiftl
Website: http://www.stiftl-oktoberfest.de

The old medieval timbered Zur Bratwurst tent specializes in roasted sausages grilled over a wood fire. Grab a brat and an Augustiner beer which is served from a wooden cask. It gets busy outside the tent since they offer street sales of their savory brats. This is a small tent with only 170 seats. As the name Bratwurst (sausage) implies, you can get all kinds of sausages, including Bavarian specialty sausages.  In 2007, Werner Hochreiter, landlord of the beer garden and “Hochreiter’s Steirer am Markt” at the Viktualienmarkt, took over the conspicuous timber frame house and called it “Zur Bratwurst”.

At the Oktoberfest since:  2007
Seats Inside:
  558
Beer:   Augustiner from wooden cask
Host:  Werner Hochreiter
Website:   www.zurbratwurst.de

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